Day 1 Strokestown – Clondra, c. 20km. The Assassination of Major Denis Mahon (November 2nd 1847)

  Major Denis Mahon, the landlord of Strokestown Park House, was assassinated on November 2nd 1847. He was the first and most high profile Irish landlord to be murdered during the Great Famine. The assassination of Major Denis Mahon is vividly recounted by Ciarán Reilly in Strokestown and the Great Irish Famine (2014): The summer months of 1847 were relatively calm at Strokestown and there does not appear to have been any immediate backlash against the assisted emigration scheme [of the 1,490] or continued clearances. By the end of August though, relations between landlord and tenants were deteriorating rapidly....

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Day 5 Longwood-Maynooth c.27km. Cathal Póirtéir speaking in Gaelic on Irish Famine Pot in Enfield, County Meath

In the heart of Enfield, County Meath, can be found an Irish Famine Soup Pot that serves as a memorial to the Great Hunger and all who perished, suffered, and fled from the town in the 1840s.  The Famine Soup Pot memorial was dedicated in May, 2017. Shortly after it was installed, the National Famine Walkers paid a visit and Cathal Póirtéir described the folklore of Famine pots speaking in...

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Day 2 Clondra – Abbeyshrule 30km. Michael Collins Irish Times article about walking in the footsteps of James Flood (2017)

Walking in the footsteps of James Flood, Famine emigrant to Canada Within six years, most of those who survived the passage to Canada were dead https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/walking-in-the-footsteps-of-james-flood-famine-emigrant-to-canada-1.3122571 Fri, Jun 16, 2017, 22:00 Michael Collins 0 The 155km journey retraced the footsteps of 1,490 Famine emigrants. All photographs: Trinity College Dublin’s ADAPT Team On June 1st, along with 13 others, I completed the six-day 2017 National Famine Walk. The 155km journey from Strokestown to Dublin Quays along the Royal Canal retraced the footsteps of 1,490 tenants who, evicted from Denis Mahon’s Strokestown estate in 1847, participated in Mahon’s so-called assisted emigration...

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Day 6 Maynooth – Dublin c.27km. Christine Kinealy on Queen Victoria “the Famine Queen’s” visit to Carton House

Tenants in Costume Perform for Queen Victoria and Prince Albert at Carton House The National Famine Way passes the entrance to the Carton House estate of Lord Leinster near Maynooth in County Kildare, where the “Famine Queen” Victoria and Prince Albert visited in 1849. Professor Christine Kinealy, founding Director of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University, writes about Queen Victoria’s visit to Carton House. Queen Victoria remains a controversial figure for her role during the Great Famine. The widespread belief that she made no financial contribution to assist her starving subjects in Ireland meant that she is widely remembered as ‘the...

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